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Coverline Information

Drawing a coverline is a very important step in charting.  It is drawn to help you distinguish when your have ovulated (showing a temperature shift or surge) and helps you monitor your temperatures after ovulation during your luteal phase.  This page will explain how and when to draw your coverline on your fertility spreadsheet and provides a link at the bottom of this page where a sample has been drawn.

When To Draw Coverline
When your waking body temperature rises more than 2/10's of a degree higher than the previous six days you will draw your coverline.  This normally occurs during your thermal shift the day after ovulation.

How Much is 2/10's?
Two-tenths of a degree is also the amount of degree used in logging your temps on your spreadsheet.   It is calculated after the decimal point in a three digit temp.  A jump for 97.5 to 97.7 (.5 to .7) is a rise that is 2/10's of a degree higher.
 

Drawing Your Coverline
When you have identified a temperature that is at least 2/10's of a degree higher than the previous 6 days - highlight those previous 6 days.  Locate the highest of the highlighted temperatures.  Draw a continuous line that is 1/10's of a degree higher than that of the highest of the highlighted temperatures.  The line should run all the way across your chart.

Temps To Overlook
Illness, medication, lack of sleep, stress and other factors can cause an out of the ordinary (higher) temperature reading.  When calculating your coverline, overlook these temperatures.  High menstrual period temperatures should also not be included when calculating your coverline.

 

Calculating Coverline

Day 09 Day 10 Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15 Day 16 Day 17
98.2 98.2 98.2 98.2 98.2 98.2 98.2 98.2 98.2
98.1 98.1 98.1 98.1 98.1 98.1 98.1 98.1 98.1
98.0 98.0 98.0 98.0 98.0 98.0 98.0 98.0 98.0
97.9 97.9 97.9 97.9 97.9 97.9 97.9 97.9 97.9
97.8 97.8 97.8 97.8 97.8 97.8 97.8 97.8 97.8
97.7 97.7 97.7 97.7 97.7 97.7 97.7 97.7 97.7
97.6 97.6 97.6 97.6 97.6 97.6 97.6 97.6 97.6
97.5 97.5 97.5 97.5 97.5 97.5 97.5 97.5 97.5

This chart shows day 9 through day 17.  The waking temperatures are highlighted in yellow.   The first day the waking temperature was more than 2/10's of a degree higher then the  previous six days was on day 16.    The highest of the previous six days is day 13.   The coverline is then calculated by drawing the coverline 1/10 of a degree higher then day 13 at 97.9.   97.9 is shown as the coverline by the blue font running the length of the chart.    

When Ovulation Occurred
On this chart, ovulation most likely occurred on day 15.  Peak day would have been the last day of eggwhite cm or extreme vaginal wetness.  This usually happens a day or two prior to the thermal shift.  Remember, having intercourse after ovulation has occurred is too late for successful conception.  Your peak day is usually the day before or the day of ovulation.  Your temperature will rise only after you have ovulated due to the heat producing hormone progesterone.  This is why it is so important to chart your cervical fluid and position that way you will be able to indicate when your peak day is.  Charting your temperatures alone only will tell you when you have ovulated AFTER you have ovulated.